Why Should You Consider Reading Faith in Doubt: Do You Question Your Faith?

I’ve written about how Faith in Doubt was a 4-year project and about why you shouldn’t be daunted by the page count, so I’d like to go into more details for people who might still be on the fence despite such assurances and explain briefly what each section has to offer so I wanted to explain in more details what each section contains for both Part I and Part II.

The book itself is actually 1034 pages with the approximately 1000 other pages being copious citations. I made sure to read and re-read several chapters of the many books that I cited for my research to make sure that I gave the most accurate information to make sure it is applied correctly. That can still be daunting, which is why I made split editions. Part I is 269 pages in total with approximately 12 pages of citations for the Preface and first 5 chapters. Part I is about the general issues of how religion is applied to everyday life such as the belief that personal luck is due to a God’s intervention or a critique of the usage of prayer. Part I applies psychological research from books such as Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman for cognitive psychology aspects, Influence: Science and Practice by Robert A. Cialdini for social interactions regarding some religious behavior, and the social theory of Alexa Ispas’s Politics and Identity: A Social Identity Perspective to apply to in-group/out-group social dynamics of religion. For certain chapters within Part I, I apply Friedrich Nietzsche’s criticisms and perspective such as the chapter on belief in the afterlife and making my own commentary on the research of the mentality of suicide bombers that are cited. I’ve read all of Nietzsche’s main works and apply aphorisms from different books throughout both Part I and Part II to give a different philosophical perspective on religion. For instance, one of Nietzsche’s thorough critiques was that the concept of the afterlife being the purpose of this life was a worship of death over life as a form of meaning. Nietzsche argued ancient people couldn’t find other more healthy purposes for their existence because of all the suffering and confusion that they went through so a hatred of life and worship of death became their meaning, which is what most present-day religions are based upon. I use this perspective in concomitant with the psychological research and analytical philosophy whenever applicable in order to make the most thorough refutation of common religious beliefs and practices that most theists participate in, within the US and across the world.

Part II is broken into separate sections beginning with Original Sin. Original Sin is often vaguely thought of or defined by most Christians and Jews in modern times. Sinfulness’s applicability to Islam is dependent on an Imam’s perspective on how it relates to Islam’s purity theology. As such, I thought it necessary to share my own perspective on the term and Nietzsche’s sharp criticisms of the concept. Sinfulness is interpreted and analyzed as a hatred of human existence and I apply Carol Dweck and Heidi Grant Halvorson’s psychological research on beliefs in rigidity and fixed personality traits to sinfulness because it really does seem to apply accurately. Most people probably wouldn’t make the connection but the very vague idea of Original Sin is ingrained to people through indoctrination. The next chapter focuses on research related to the problem of Free Will likely having been debunked by modern science and the concept of Sin’s failure to measure-up to what we see as a nonsensical view of Free Will. For instance, I cite Beau Lotto’s Deviate to point out that the mind is a statistical distribution where too often you need to unlearn untrue beliefs before you can learn true ones and how much of your beliefs are pre-determined by the quality of your education, the language you speak, and too often how other people treat your ethnic background or religious background. I don’t mean specifically Western countries in this context, but rather apply it to countries like Lebanon where such backgrounds really determine your quality of life because the society is split so heavily on religious grounds. Lastly, I point out how even the defense of Free Will by neuroscientists effectively debunk the vague concept of Sinfulness because the application of the term is the reverse of what people expect. For instance, people who can fight off addictions would have more Free Will than those who are addicted to drugs and can’t fight them off and therefore the very concept as it is believed by most Abrahamic theists doesn’t work with real life circumstances of human experience. It would therefore be a useless fantasy and not an important moral teaching. I cover how the use of human violence to justify the concept sin falls into unjustifiable cognitive illusions where we as people put too much stock in negative events without comparing positive events.

The section on Abrahamic religions in Part II is a different approach for each of them. For Judaism, I cite the archaeological evidence debunking the Bible such as the lack of evidence that Moses was anything more than a fictional character. The lack of evidence of Israelites ever having been slaves, how their true origins are a breakaway group of Canaanites that had a cultural revolution to name themselves the Israelites, and takeover another agrarian plot of land separate from their erstwhile group. I cite news articles about how these myths negatively impact the contemporary rights of Jewish women and the LGBT within Israel. I further argue Nietzsche’s own critique where he pointed out that Judaism’s main problem is that it looks for an infallible cult leader referred to as the “Messiah” and how such a theological concept will always create harsh divisions where some Jewish folk will argue the new converts have been deceived by an imposter away from the Abrahamic God, while the new converts to the infallible cult leader’s faith will see their erstwhile community as having been deceived away from the Abrahamic God. Does that sound ridiculous? That’s the entire legacy of Christianity and arguably Islam. Which brings me to the sections on Christianity and Islam in Part II. With Christianity, I cover how the entire religion is a thorough self-contradiction that splinters off into thousands of smaller sects because of every aspect of the religion is based on self-contradictory beliefs. From the Sermon on the Mount’s self-contradictions, to the differences in interpretations by Christian soldiers and Christian pacifists, and to Jesus’s own claims on fulfilling or abolishing the Mosiac law depending upon what denomination of Christianity that you’re part of. If you probe more deeply into the theology, the self-contradictions of Christianity worsen to the point that people have to use open interpretation because the Bible at face value loses any coherence with reality. Christianity is Monotheistic yet follows the Pagan practice of 3 Gods in One (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are copies of ancient Mother Goddess and Father-God polytheism likely stolen from Roman mythology), Jesus is meek and mild while raving like a narcissist about being God and the Son of God, Heaven is a free gift but if you don’t accept Jesus then you go to hell forever, and doing sinful acts like murder or rape are morally bad but Jesus will forgive you regardless of how much you harm other people. In effect, Christianity is a bucket of self-contradictions that actually doesn’t have any moral values to teach people and I make my case more thoroughly in my book. By comparison, Islam is the dumbest religion of the major religious faiths. The entire project is a anti-intellectual cult where the Prophet Mohammad is celebrated as the perfect human being who can do no wrong and every Muslim must strive to be like him, so when Mohammad raped and murdered then Muslims must view that as self-defense or pure perfection beyond conventional morality that goes into an argument from ignorance. Western Muslims make excuses, while people in Muslim majority countries ignore child rape and torture because Mohammad proscribed them or because the Quran teaches such behavior as morally good for Muslims. Islam is also a purity cult, where non-belief is seen as going against the in-group purity and so Muslims are called upon to murder Ex-Muslims to protect the purity of the Ummah (Islamic nation). It’d be more correct to say that Islam is sophistry upon sophistry with its utterly nonsensical belief structure that uses its history and ascetic practices to appear deep and meaningful, when it is sheer madness made by a warlord who said whatever that he wanted off the top of his head because he made a successful cult that perceives everything that he does as infallible. It’s likely that Islamic success in war is what helped it encroach itself across multiple countries; Islam is built upon the success of human genocide and cultural genocide in tandem as it made its bloody mark upon the world. Moreover, people in ancient times believed that people fighting and dying for something must’ve meant that the religion therefore has a deeper meaning of profound truth for why their followers die for it. The success of Islam likely facilitated belief there was a deeper and underlying cause to the success and once you add cultural genocide, the worship of Mohammad as the perfect human being is completed. Islam’s internal theology is categorically against Enlightenment values of Free Speech and Free Expression; to be a Muslim, you must accept the Quran as unquestionable fact with no open interpretation like in Christianity. The Sharia isn’t a proscribed set of instructions that Muslims can pick and choose from, this is a lie taught by Western news media and it devastated my trust in Western corporate news organizations to discover that this was a blatant lie. It really broke my implicit trust in the mainstream media’s authenticity when I discovered how deeply they lie about Islam’s internal theology. The concept of Sharia in particular is somewhat like a theological pyramid that Muslims must follow; the Quran is on top which all Muslims must accept as unquestionable fact, then the Sunnah which teaches about Mohammad’s life, then the companions of Mohammad and the first followers of Islam are all explicitly used to dictate everything that a Muslim can or cannot do according to Islamic jurisprudence. Internally, Islam is taught as equivalent to science with Imams and Sheiks being words meant to designate “Islamic Scholars” — meaning the only people allowed to comment on Islam are people who accept the Quran, that Mohammad was a prophet, and the nonsensical beliefs in flying horses, pens that write on golden tablets, and talking hands and feet. Imams and Sheiks accept Islam as unquestionable fact and never contest these nonsensical beliefs. This theology of Sharia is why Muslims argue that any outsider who criticizes Islam – including Ex-Muslims – have no right to an opinion on Islam; many actually believe that this is deep and meaningful and equivalent to scientific discoveries. There’s so much more which I can’t delve into within just a blog post; a thorough critique on Islam would probably be longer than even all my longest blog posts combined as there is ample material on how insane Islam actually is. If you want to know more, and wish to separate what Islam teaches from what the Western mainstream media explicitly lies about its teachings, I’ve written it all in my book.

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Free Sale September! From September 1st to September 5th, Faith in Doubt Split Editions Are Available For Free

In the hopes of gaining more traction for my ebook, I’ve made this freely available from September 1st to September 5th, 2019 so if you’re interested and like a good deal, please think about obtaining my book for free:

Other Ebooks are also available for free. My fantasy story criticizing Neo-Nazism, the book I’m no longer proud of criticizing New Atheism in case anyone is interested in how my views have changed over the years, and my pamphlet opposing Christian conversions in India:

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Expanding Faith in Doubt’s Kindle Edition Due To Friendly Feedback

Now that my book has been out for a few weeks, I’ve decided to listen to the initial complaints and created two separate Ebook versions for Parts I and II due to popular demand from potential readers who want the ebook to be more “accessible” to them. The accessibility seems to be a psychological issue more than anything else since people seem to find the huge length to be daunting despite it being a fairly good deal for any avid readers interested in topics pertaining to religion. I try to point out that readers should think of it as 6-7 books in one and for the low price of $9.99 for the ebook edition, but unfortunately this seems to have failed to convince most people. The huge length was the primary complaint from most people on the fence about purchasing the ebook version. It seems the 2554 pages was just too much for most people who are interested, so I’ve listened to the criticism that I received and provided an ebook version that is broken up into two books. I can only really blame myself for not doing this in the first place as it seems like a sensible option in hindsight. The physical edition will not be effected with any changes by this decision and I’ll leave the first ebook edition which has 2554 pages for those who prefer and enjoy a larger book to read. Unfortunately, the prices will have to be $8.99 each and while that may seem ridiculous with the full ebook being $9.99, I really do need to look out for my own bottom-line as all the effort I put into the ebook did have its own cost-benefits for my dwindling finances. I’m really sorry if that sounds like a copout, but it is the truth. If it is any consolation, the price of $8.99 is still far lower than ebooks ranging from $12-18 dollars on average from traditional publishing. Also, I’ll be putting both on Kindle Unlimited and I’ll probably be making Part I as Freely available. I intend to make the separated Parts I and II more accessible to the people of India too as I hoped for an expanded reach into that emerging market and to further my points about reforming certain aspects of Sanatana Dharma.

I’ve sent the new editions to Amazon and one is already in the status of Publishing so expect at least one of them soon.

Update: Well, this was quite fast. The exclusive Part I and Part II are out now.

Progress Note: Finite Incantatem

Note: ALL FINISHED! I’ve sent it to Amazon for review.

I’ve finally finished my book, Faith In Doubt: Do You Question Your Faith?

I completed the penultimate chapter earlier today and with that I’ve completed everything I needed to write down. I had spend almost an hour with Amazon’s Physical self-publishing preview checker, I had pre-prepared and made sure to change any Georgia font, but for some reason some portions with Helvetica font kept showing up, even though I had thought I changed it. Evidently, Microsoft Word 2008 changes the font when loading up documents slowly. The preview system kept showing one issue that needed fixing each time instead of all of them. Eventually, I could click approve and made sure to check over everything before doing so. I’m still in a state of disbelief that this journey may finally be over.

There’s been an issue with pricing that came-up that I hadn’t expected at all. But I’ll wait to go into details if Amazon approves both the Kindle and Physical edition that I’ve sent. I’m worried that the Political Correctness climate and the ridiculous difference in pricing between the Kindle and Physical copy could cause them to reject them, but Amazon is open enough towards Free Speech to allow Nazi books so I’m hopeful. I really have to commend them for sticking to Free Speech as much as possible unlike other companies. Their only sticking point is not having any hateful content in the description and obviously not advocating for violence, which is reasonable since they are a private company that sells merchandise and can’t have that representing them.

I’m hoping there’s no issues. I’m pretty sure that, should I see both versions available, it’ll just be pure giddiness at finally having one of my personal dreams turned into a reality thanks to my dedication over the years. I’m cautiously excited, but if its self-published then I can start leaping for joy.

Overall, this has been quite the journey. Below is the finalized version of the Table of Contents:

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Islamophobia Doesn’t Exist and Neither Does Islamic Culture

For those who have been waiting patiently for me to finish writing my book, I’m sure it has crossed your mind that I could be lying or I could be too nice to Islam due to my arguments distinguishing Anti-Muslim bigotry from criticism of Islam. Moreover, some of you might think there’s not much I can offer compared to harsh critics like Apostate Prophet (who admittedly did influence a portion of my writings in the book I am working on and I happily credit him in the book itself), but I want to put any of those potential concerns aside as unambiguously as possible.

The portion below is quite honestly just one small speck of content on what to expect from my upcoming book and the criticism of religions therein. I focus on the structure, assumptions, and claims of each particular Major Religion in Part II of the book to analyze, critique, and repudiate them. As shown before in a previous blog post, I devote six chapters to Islam.

This’ll be the last of my shared excerpts from Faith in Doubt and I hope it generates enough interest. This particular set of information I shared on r/Islam after they deleted my sharing of the Apostate Prophet debunking the scientific miracles of the Quran topic. After leaving this for awhile since I cited Islamic sources, the Moderators of r/Islam quickly removed it in less than a day.  I shared it on r/exmuslim and found myself unable to have my topics and posts appear on their subreddit since then, so evidently this was too much for even r/exmuslim since I seem to have been shadowbanned by them. I messaged the Moderators and never got a response back. Furthermore, let this one small speck from my upcoming book serve as an explanation for why I don’t believe Islam can call itself a culture and why Islamophobia is a stupid term.

Oh, and the “citations” at the bottom are due to how WordPress blogging configures citations and isn’t related to the book. The Works Cited page consists only of a small portion of the chapter that I’m taking this excerpt from.

For those curious and who may want to check the previous content from my book which I’ve already shared:

The earliest version of Chapter 1  (This chapter has been heavily modified in the final version and this sample no longer reflects the current version).

Sample Chapter 6 of Faith in Doubt (This has been somewhat modified and broken into two chapters in the final version).

The following is the final excerpt that I’ll share from my own soon-to-be finished book, Faith in Doubt, written under my pseudonym Jarin Jove:

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Progress Note: Death in the Family, Burnout, and Striving Onward

As you’ll recall, I foolishly anticipated that I’d probably be done by last month. That didn’t happen. I had hoped for my next update to be the good news of sending my book for self-publishing and delayed writing this in the hopes of doing just that, but . . . I can’t and I feel I owe people who are wondering why I just suddenly became silent an explanation and clarification.

Last month on the 8th, my grandfather passed away. This would now be my second grandfather to do so. So, I’ve now lost both my grandparents on my mother’s side and my grandfather on my father’s side. My mother was a wreck and I went through a mild depression. The death wasn’t unexpected, due to his failing health for years, and he lived a good, long life up to age 94 but it takes awhile to sink in. I had to suddenly do all the religious customs because doing otherwise is seen as disrespectful to my grandfather’s memory and my mother was already in shambles so I didn’t want to add to her grief. My mother was even more of a wreck at the actual funeral. My siblings and I did the best we could to comfort her. To put it mildly, it was emotionally exhausting from beginning to end and there was just no time for me to even put any thought into writing when that was going on. A bit before this happened, a close friend told me that he was going to need surgery to remove half his thyroid because it may have cancer and had grown too big regardless. He had the surgery yesterday and got back to me last night; they still may need to do a second surgery in case the thyroid they removed is found to have cancer in it. Admittedly, I don’t understand the exact process well enough, but I was feeling paranoid that he could also die on me, even if I knew such paranoia was only due to emotional grief likely influenced by my grandfather passing away. Yet another close friend is in dire economic straits and I’m concerned, but I’ll spare the details of that one.

For most of last month, I tried writing, I felt pissed off at myself for failing yet another deadline after failing the one in June, but I just couldn’t. My family took a 10-day trip, which I refused to go along with, and I just felt far too exhausted emotionally and physically to do much of anything. I felt emotional and physical exhaustion because I had been so demanding of myself to finish on time, but it felt like I just collapsed inward from emotional exhaustion due to all these competing factors and my own ire at myself. I had to focus on self-care, because everything was tiring me out. I felt horrible because it seemed at one point like I was making excuses, but the more rational part of my brain shut that thought down by repudiating it with the argument that such a sentiment was mere self-loathing and demanded I focus on my emotional health instead of being stuck with highly flawed reasoning. I had to take a break for those ten days and just watch some anime, listen to music, and read something unrelated to the topics I’d been writing about to calm myself. It was wrong for me to feel self-contempt for doing this, I had to remind myself of that and remember that I’m just a fallible human being who makes mistakes. Therefore, falling short sometimes, even for prolonged periods in this case due to the circumstances, is okay.

I became preoccupied with rather silly quibbles online too. I sometimes don’t know what the most effective way to change people’s minds is and so I try to push back against many Christian and Islamic apologists online. I try to push back against Hindus who express falsehoods, anti-Muslim bigotry, or nonsensical beliefs too. I’m honestly feeling cynical about the future of Hinduism. At this point, they’re adapting and becoming more like the Abrahamic faiths in their views of women’s sexuality, their views on blasphemy (borrowing, of all things, “phobia” of Hinduism which just reeks of desperation for Abrahamic values similar to Islam’s idiotic Islamophobia), and worst of all, proselytizing Ex-Muslims online similar to born-again Christians. I’ve seen many denounce atheism now despite the fact Hinduism literally created atheism from an anti-theist perspective in 600 BCE. The earliest atheists were from Sanatana Dharma including the Vedic branch of Hinduism and yet many Hindus of India reject this entirely in order to be more “respectable” to the cult of death of Abrahamic theology.

Nevertheless, I did return to writing shortly after and I’ve finished yet another chapter but . . . well, I expected to write 15-20 pages and found it to be 63 pages. This means I’m only left with 6 pages to keep to the limit of 828 pages for the physical edition of Amazon’s Self-Publishing Content guidelines. As such, I will regrettably have to remove a large portion of the Preface from the physical version because I need space for the final chapter that needs to be written. I’ve already written the conclusion, I just need to write the penultimate chapter and I should be finished. I’m hoping there’ll be no more time lapsed in finishing. It’s amazing how quickly an entire month’s worth of time is consumed and spent. I decided to take yesterday and today off to keep myself from burnout again. I’ve found that paradoxically giving myself a break each hour has made me more productive. It’s similar to the pomodoro technique, but with more time working. I’ll rest easy for a few days and then work to finish it. I strive onwards for completion of this project, it is the hardest project I’ve ever undertaken in my life, and it feels very satisfying.

Progress Note: I Am An Idiot

Upon nearing the final portions of Part II of my book, I decided to check my word count and page count by making a separate file to place all that I have written into one word document, I found that, to my own chagrin, that I had undervalued myself and overshot the lengths I had already written… to the point that I will have to make this 4-year book project into a series. If you would like to read portions from the actual book to better understand what it’ll contain, here is a sample draft of chapter 6 which doesn’t reflect the final version, but it is still mostly the same.

At the time I decided to check, I found that my word count for Part II was 325,718 and combined with Part I which was on a separate file, it became 404,444 words. It amounted to 881 pages in word. For comparison, my first and terrible attempt at an ebook is around 18,000 words and takes up 203 pages double-spaced on Amazon’s ebook page count. As of now, my word count is 406,958 words and 1,001 pages in what has been completed thus far. So as you can plainly see, I have indeed worked on this book for four years. I will have to change it into a series and I wonder if I should scrub all references to Part III that were made to allude to that portion so that readers would look forward to it, or if I should keep it there so people get interested in future book releases… I really don’t know. It is intended to be a Two-Part Book series now though. I feel a strange and confusing feeling of pride and self-contempt that I’ve done this to myself.

I will now need to make two separate conclusions and I am struggling to think of what would even be appropriate for this book, since the intention was to finish Part III and make a conclusion for what was to be a single book. I’m contemplating a few ideas on how to conclude the entirety of the book as of now. I still haven’t finished the section on Hinduism, but I’ll probably do that one last because I really want to be sure that I can provide a satisfying conclusion that challenges people. I’m not sure if I’ll succeed on that point, but I’ll try with what I have thus far.

For those of you who might be curious, here is my Table of Contents. I wish to take down any notion that I’ll be going soft on Islam and harsher on other religions. I wish to show my ruthlessness upon all of them out of my compassion for the victims of religion:

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Progress Note: Writing A Book Is A Second Job

Fully completed revising and citing all of Part I, finished revising and citing the sections on Original Sin and Judaism, and currently in the process of revising and citing the section about Christianity for Part II. I spent too much time on revising the section on Islam for the third time, but admittedly I did think it was necessary because it helped for me to write further clarifications on the problems of Islam. I haven’t spent as much time on the section of Buddhism and I didn’t even begin Hinduism, but I do have the outline set and after researching further, I haven’t found any reasons why the outline would need revision before I begin writing the chapters down for the section on Hinduism.

It feels surreal that this four year journey of writing, revising, and trying to improve will finally be coming to an end soon. I had felt bad about it taking so long until I read that most authors take 4-10 years to finish a book, read up on the book Getting Things Done and realized writing a book wasn’t easy, and recalled the difficulty of the entire endeavor from Hank Green’s explanation on distinguishing tasks from projects. A book is a long-term project. People who believe it is easy probably don’t think about the numerous steps required for writing an exceptionally good book. It requires knowing your audience for the book, selecting a fitting genre that hopefully won’t drown out your book from the tens of thousands of others, it requires knowledge of copyright so you don’t get scammed out of your money both in your own country and overseas, possibly hiring an editor to fix your grammar mistakes (I won’t be doing this and instead rely upon my essay writing abilities from years of college — potentially to my detriment), paying someone to make a good cover that’ll attract readers (I used fiverr.com), and purchasing a ISBN from your home country. All of that is before marketing your book, which I’m not sure I have a good plan for. The most daunting prospect throughout all of this is that you can spend so much of your time and effort and you may not even make a single sale. The three books I’ve written, the political ones I could have admittedly done a better job in, didn’t really sell much beyond $60 combined throughout all the years they were available up to the present moment and I spent over $50 on advertising. Alternatively, when I released my first ever book for free, it was downloaded just above 100 times, but the moment it was on sale, there was maybe 5 or 6 sales at best over several years. And only one review which didn’t go into any details on any criticisms they had about the book and gave it a 3/5. The dystopian-comedy fantasy novel I wrote to mock Neo-Nazis and their ilk did marginally better since it made 4 sales within the first year and got 2 positive reviews. To be clear though, I don’t really mind since I didn’t put in my best effort, but rather just wanted to prove to myself that I could write about such topics. I think it was probably a detriment overall and I wonder whether I should just pull all the books I’ve written thus far off of Amazon permanently and have only this specific book I’m writing to be the only one available for sale. The only reason I don’t is because if a reader ever gets curious as to how much I’ve changed in my thought process over political issues, they can read about my previous beliefs and compare them to my contemporary ones.

I’m not sure how many of you who are unfamiliar with the habits of writing will believe this, but I honestly feel that writing a book is harder than most mundane physical labor jobs and even the job I had at the Veteran’s home as a Health Unit Coordinator for patients with dementia. I’ve been an unloader, taking palettes off of trucks, and I think that writing a book is several orders of magnitude harder. As an unloader, I had to physically pull things, flee whenever a badly formed palette off a truck began to fall near me, and move it to specific locations in a store. It’s quite a thoughtless job. By contrast, writing a book requires making an outline, researching several topics at great lengths to give an informed opinion, and possibly making additions or changes. For fantasy or Sci-fi writers, its several orders of magnitude more difficult since you have to make a culture that feels authentic or possibly multiple cultures that feel authentic to readers, focus on other aspects of the setting, make interesting subplot points, foreshadowing specific twists in stories, making realistic characters, pinpoint an entire journey and the overarching theme of the journey, write everyone’s dialogue, and provide an engaging motivation to hook readers. Moreover, regardless of if its non-fiction or fiction, you’re competing with every other book in your genre. And even after all that, you may not make a single penny for all of your effort. George R.R. Martin is right to say that writing a book is a gamble. In fact, according to fictional writers who report on their experiences, the average fictional novel may take anywhere from 4 – 10 years to complete. People really underestimate the difficulty. For example, if you’re working two jobs and one of your free days from one job overlap with a day you’re off of work in your other job, then you’ll probably find it practically impossible to work on a book. Laundry, possibly taking care of kids, groceries, and so forth will all take time. And you need time to unwind especially if just one of your jobs is physically or mentally taxing and demands a high level of work performance. It may not seem important, but writing a books table of contents, chapters, and even taking free time to think over the book (especially if you’re writing a fantasy or Sci-fi novel) is important. You can’t concentrate and think over such aspects when doing rudimentary chores or when doing tasks at your job. Even free time at lunch isn’t enough to think over concrete stories or methods of researching new information. At best, you’ll be jotting down a couple of notes that you could never get to or potentially could forget. Writing takes concentration and habit; it is a job all on its own and its one that you may never get paid for and possibly never even finish. You really do run the risk of wasting so much of your time and effort on something that yielded nothing valuable as a return of investment.

Despite all that, I really do feel what I’m working on warrants the risk and is vitally important to write. At best, it’ll hopefully inspire others. I’m sure every author who has ever written a book wishes to become famous and I’m not going to pretend I’m an exception as that would be dishonest. I do hope it is financially successful too, but I doubt it judging from my own track record and some of the responses I get for some arguments I share online. I hope religious believers at least give the book a shot and that it gets decent reviews at least. I want it to be the sum-total of all my arguments against religion and a critique of different religions methods and assumptions about the world. I suspect that all I’ll be seen as is arrogant though, but I hope not. I’m still focused on trying to finish this and hopefully it’ll be done by either this month or early next month.

Update: Currently working on my book for the next few weeks

I am cutting out time from the internet to focus strictly upon writing my book and hopefully finishing it by this month. I want it done, but every time I learn something new, I feel compelled to incorporate it. It doesn’t help that I am always deeply involved in political topics due to my focus of study and interests. There’s always so much going on and changing or something new I’m learning that I fear discredits a specific point I wrote down in my book and so I must check, re-check, and re-write so that my points and criticisms are salient. The book will be utilizing logical fallacies, Cognitive and Social psychology, and Nietzschean philosophy for my critique of religion. I want this book to be the sum-total of all my criticisms of religion. It doesn’t help that I deep dive into rabbit holes of knowledge over and over to thoroughly learn something specific and new. I fear it may weaken my critiques unintentionally at this pace, but also feel like covering as much ground as possible is incredibly important. These incidents have been the entire journey of writing this book so far; I originally intended a book of general critiques for all religions and then expanded when I realized it wouldn’t hit the crux of the matter. I divided the book into Parts with Part I being the general criticisms and Part II being the criticisms related to specific religious theology. Even in the context of Part II, I need to make some generalizations because being completely specific to certain branches of a religion is impossible to cover accurately in arguably even one lifetime and so I focus on core teachings. I think the approach of focusing on the core teachings of each major religion is the best middle-ground for Part II. I often have to utilize different approaches to different beliefs. However, as I was writing Part II, I began to realize the excuse that “religion does good for some people” could be used to exonerate bad beliefs and so I made yet another expansion. I have yet to write Part III at all so far as I’m currently finalizing Part I and amending Part II, but I will hopefully have Part III written down and have at least the draft form completed by this month.

For that matter, when going through the process of writing and critiquing each particular religion, I was forced to make different amounts of chapters depending upon the religion. Buddhism doesn’t have as much convoluted sophistry as the Abrahamic faiths. Thus, I could finish the entirety of my critique in one chapter in the draft I have so far and it includes both the Theravada and Mahayana branches of Buddhism. By contrast, due to their respective forms of convoluted sophistry, Christianity and Islam are both taking 6 chapters for their Part II critiques. A friend has suggested I’m taking too much time and that I should just make it into separate books, but the Part I critiques are to introduce guiding principles in order to go forth critiquing Part II and I think Part III will be very relevant to that entire ensemble for the book. I want it all there and I think its best that it’s all placed together in one whole book to cover all of my criticisms.

Honestly though, throughout the process and years spent writing this book, half the time I’m spent wondering that it’ll all be for nothing. That it’ll all be a complete waste of my time. That despite all my time and effort, it will have meant that I just wasted 4 whole years of my life. The other half of the time, I get enticed by the prospect of making a best-seller… but let’s be serious, every author who has ever written a book has probably dreamed of their book being a best seller and making a lot of sales at some stage in the process. I do hope this book does well, but I have very good reasons to doubt all the effort I’ve put into it. It truly worries me that I’ve just been wasting my time. But, I have to finish it and once I do, I’ll either be promoting it or moving onto another book and learning from failure.

Why I became an Atheist

I had come to the realization in 10th grade that Christianity and Hinduism couldn’t both be true due to irreconcilable differences. Growing up in the USA, you get a lot of Christian symbolism in television, movies, and sometimes in music. Even the use of the term “God” during the pledge of allegiance made me feel different because as a Hindu, I had been led to believe in a polytheistic view when growing up. I seriously began to wonder if Hinduism was really true around middle school. When I visited India as a kid (at age 12 for my cousin’s wedding), I realized that people really did believe in Hinduism and that Christianity was as vacant in the parts of India I visited just like Hinduism is vacant in the U.S., because there was no frickin’ way people danced around a fire pot for 8 hours to gain blessings for a wedding from various deities. That takes dedication . . . and I was on a rooftop with a bunch of other people sitting in the cold as some Hindu priest rambled on in some nonsensical ceremony while the bride and groom occasionally had to circle around the fire pot with him.

It was later on that I realized people just used their personal surroundings as a sort of “proof” that their religion was real because so many around them believe it. Moreover, I had to come to terms with the fact that if Hinduism is true then the majority of the 300 million people living in the U.S. and millions living in Europe were fooling themselves. By contrast, if Christianity was true, then 1.2 billion Hindus were fooling themselves. Worse than that, I had believed if Hinduism is true then believers of the Abrahamic faiths were condemned to live in misery in the world unless they recognized Hinduism – or in some cases end-up in some Hindu version of hell or reincarnation. To clarify, my belief on that was misguided as the Bhagavad Gita which I read years later clarified that all you have to be is a good moral person and that it doesn’t matter your religion (Hindu or not) to obtain Moksha (Self-liberation to either become one with Brahman or to beyond depending on the interpretation of whichever Hindu school of thought is believed in). Conversely, if the Abrahamic faiths were true then my entire extended family was being sent to hell since before I was born. So, I decided not to lie to myself about the negatives of religion.

By age 14, I became agnostic and began to question the meaning of life. Although, it was more accurate to say agnostic-theist; that is, I didn’t know whether there was a God or gods or not, but still believed. By age 15, I became an atheist-agnostic. And to be honest, I felt the shift from agnostic – that is, the feeling of being unsure of whether a God existed or not – to an atheist-agnostic was more profound and impactful to me personally. It was with the understanding that I couldn’t know whether a God existed or not, but that I didn’t believe in it on a personal level due to the comparisons I kept making. I was confused how anyone else could have confidence. If you were a Christian, then you must believe all non-Christians are going to hell. Muslim? Same thing. Jewish? It wouldn’t matter how many Christians or Muslims there were in the world and the appeal to conversion would stop mattering if Judaism was the truth. Hinduism, same thing.

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