Survive The Jive: A Youtuber Filled With Lies

I just happened upon this interesting Youtuber when doing some further research regarding the Aryan Invasion theory:

I decided to look up his “scientific sources” because I want to be wrong. Only to find to my surprise that this man’s sources contradict his claims in his video.

Source 2: Is only about migration within the Steppes, absolutely NO INFORMATION about migration to India at all.

Source 3: Claims to only be a made-up scenario and not a scientific study in order to make a hypothesis about migration.

Source 4: Explicitly claims that the Steppes population didn’t migrate far at all in its conclusion and discredits the Indo-Aryan claim.

Please spread the word about Survive The Jive: People are unknowingly paying this man to lie to them. He didn’t check his own sources, he made-up a bunch of nonsense and people believed it without fact-checking his own sources that he linked.


It’s official: Aryan Invasion/Migration Theory completely debunked by one of its former proponents, the geneticist Niraj Rai in a paper he co-authored. Out of India Hypothesis is the most likely history from the best available evidence thus far. He explains it in the Charvaka Podcast below (some dialogue is spoken in Hindi):

Official paper in English: Please click here.

9 thoughts on “Survive The Jive: A Youtuber Filled With Lies

  1. Thank you. STJ is a notorious LIAR. He is not a Pagan, but an agent of (((academia))) and thus an enemy of Europe.

  2. STJ is an unbearable effeminierte Kunt and he hides his weak, Christian hipster chin for that reason.

  3. There is plenty of evidence indicating common roots of northern Europeans (by extension all “Nordic” Europeans I guess) in the Eastern European steppes, but these aren’t the same as “Aryans” or “Indo-Europeans”. He is absolutely obsessed with it so he can justify his fetishistic orientalism (and get around his complete lack of knowledge about European customs)

  4. You are very wrong in your analysis. Did you watch the video and note where and how he uses the sources?

    Source 2 – (used @ 15:33 in video) Jive uses this source to determine where the oldest example of the R1A haplogroup ever found was located. Source 2 finds that the haplogroup in question was from Eastern Europe. Jive uses this info to approximate where the R1A haplogroup started its journey to India; This source doesn’t need to involve India to serve Jive’s purpose.

    Source 3 – (Used @ 20:21 in video) I don’t follow you on your criticism of this one… Where does it state that it is a made-up scenario? Did you read any of this paper? Even the one sentence summary in the abstract affirms that it is not a hypothetical study: “Genome wide ancient DNA from 357 individuals from Central and South Asia sheds new light on the spread of Indo-European languages and parallels between the genetic history of two sub-continents, Europe and South Asia.” This paper is not a made-up scenario; they collected real DNA and conducted real sceintific research. Jive is entirely correct in his use of the source.

    Source 4 – (Used @ 26:58 in video) This source states in its conclusion that “the early spread of Yamnaya Bronze Age pastoralists had limited genetic impact in… South Asia…. Our findings further suggest that West Eurasian ancestry entered South Asia before and after, rather than during, the initial expansion of western steppe pastoralists, with the later event consistent with a Late Bronze Age entry of IE languages into South Asia.” So source 4 does say that steppe peoples (Western Eurasians) entered South Asia, just not the Yamnaya.
    If you had watched the video closely, you would have known that Jive has already confirmed this conclusion. At 16:24, Jive says that the Corded Ware culture moved into Asia to create the Sintashta and Andronovo cultures, bringing the R1A haplogroup with them. Jive then goes on to argue that the Andronovo were the ones to invade India; not the Yamnaya. Perhaps the most important evidence he uses to show this is in the video from 18:45 to 19:16. Here, Jive notes that blue eyes and blonde hair, characteristically European traits, are present in South Asia along with the R1A haplogroup. This is the key evidence Jive uses to refute the claim that the Yamnaya directly invaded South Asia. At 19:37 in the video, Jive says that DNA has shown that the Yamnaya didn’t have blue eyes or blonde hair. On the other hand, he says, the Andronovo people were very often blonde haired and blue-eyed. At 19:51, Jive says “If the Yamnaya DNA had reached India directly from a Yamnaya invasion into India, then none of these phenotypes would be present in South Asia, and the male Brahmans would have the R1B haplogroup [instead of] the R1A haplogroups.” Jive has come to the same conclusion as source 4, and he uses it correctly.

    Please take this criticism down. None of your points are correct, and you are falsely accusing an honest historian making his living by releasing freely available content. I invite you to reply to this comment with counterarguments, if you have them, but please take this post down.

    • Source 2: There is no causal link established, the geneticists don’t even address such a question and the study isn’t about establishing any such link, and your argument and Jive’s argument requires too much speculation without solid knowledge on India’s genetic history at that time. The Source itself claims they didn’t go far from the Steppes and doesn’t even try to suggest that it did, so that altogether debunks your claims.

      Source 3: Right in the portion that you chose purposefully not to copy and paste at all. The very first sentence: The genetic formation of Central and South Asian populations has been unclear because of an absence of ancient DNA. To address this gap, we generated genome-wide data from 362 ancient individuals, including the first from eastern Iran, Turan (Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Tajikistan), Bronze Age Kazakhstan, and South Asia. Our data reveal a complex set of genetic sources that ultimately combined to form the ancestry of South Asians today. We document a southward spread of genetic ancestry from the Eurasian Steppe, correlating with the archaeologically known expansion of pastoralist sites from the Steppe to Turan in the Middle Bronze Age (2300-1500 BCE).

      Oh, and in case you weren’t paying attention, your comments on Source 3 completely discredit your commentary on Source 2.

      Source 4: If it wasn’t the Yamnaya, the only people who this could apply to, then it no longer has any coherence as a theory. The current theory was predicated as the Yamnaya, which still didn’t make sense since the Yamnaya existed in 5000 BCE and not 1200 BCE as the purported conquest is claimed to have happened, and this argument for an Aryan conquest is becoming more and more ridiculous with no credible information backing it up. They can’t keep saying they lack evidence as an explanation for why something must have happened. The original theory was 1200 BCE, then it got pushed back to 4000 BCE since that wasn’t credible and the “conquerors” keep changing from Germanic tribes to the Yamnaya, and now they have no clue since even the Yamnaya can’t stick because the theory is false. It makes no sense that a Pastoral community could conquer a more technologically advanced civilization.

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